Tuesday, 01 November 2011 09:06

INTERVIEW WITH SAJIDA KHAN

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BY REHANA DADA, September 2005 REHANA: Sajida, how long has it been that you've been fighting this dump? SAJIDA: I became involved with the community association in mid-1993 and then fought the rates campaign. One year, we Indians paid about 80% higher than the whites. And of course the money was used to develop white areas and Indian areas were neglected. REHANA: At this stage, the dump had been here, what, your entire childhood? SAJIDA: I grew up here. It's been here since 1980 and people were fighting it even before, when they proposed to put the dump site here.…
Tuesday, 01 November 2011 09:05

PAYING TRIBUTE TO SAJIDA KHAN (1952-2007)

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By Patrick Bond and Rehana Dada Sajida Khan and her siblings grew up, and some still reside, in the Estate community of Durban (the core city in the eThekwini Municipality), a traditionally 'Indian' neighbourhood now also hosting thousands of 'African' and 'coloured' residents. There are many people around the world who know this house, because its location made Khan one of the key figures in the struggle against the world capitalist elite's 'solution' to climate change: carbon trading. The first paragraphs of a Washington Post article heralding the Kyoto Protocol in March, 2005 (just after the Russian government agreed to…
Tuesday, 01 November 2011 09:04

Brick Lane

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By Aysha Ali, Brick Lane is the story of a woman who comes from a village in Bangladesh to live in Bangla town. It describes the mundane world that Nazneen lives in, where very little happens. The film focuses on her relationship with her husband, her young lover and her children. The film looks at the ordinary: the nothingness and the loneliness of living in London. The strength of Monica Ali's book, and now the film, lies in her ability to highlight the isolation that Nazneen feels as a machinist working from home. She watches life around her through net…
Tuesday, 01 November 2011 09:03

Desis in the House

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By Raza Mir As a dyed-in-the-wool FOB leftist, I initially found it difficult to muster a whole lot of empathy for my secondgeneration comrades who seemed to be overly preoccupied with what we pejoratively termed "identity politics." It took us a while to realize that this tension between class politics and identity issues was fraudulently generated. Ofcourse there was much that was exasperating about the way in which our second generation comrades refracted all organizational issues through the lens of "what does it mean to be a desi in the US?", but it must have been equally frustrating for them…
Tuesday, 01 November 2011 09:02

First Word

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Muhindi Blood, Kenya Damu! By: Dipesh Pabari "Would that we might be adequately demystified to be unified in our political maturity; neither to use the instruments of prejudice ad hate to suffocate each other with tear gas, not to beat each other senseless, nor to shoot at each other with live bullets, nor to loot each other's shops, nor to rape each other."Thus wrote John Sibi-Okumu in the previous editorial of AwaaZ as we prepared to go to the ballot. Three months later, we sat glued to the TV screen in disbelief as the cartography of violence was sketched. In…
Tuesday, 01 November 2011 09:02

BRIEFS

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BRIEFS By Awaaz team RICHA ADHIA'S CORONATION DRAWS MIXED REACTIONS RICHA ADHIA was announced Vodacom Miss Tanzania 2007 on Saturday night,drawing mixed reactions from the audiences as some cheered, while others muttered words of disapproval. RichaThe 19-year-old led a clean sweep of the top three positions for the Dar es Salaam beauty queens. Lilian Abel from Kinondoni finished second, while Queen David from Temeke finished third. But the judges' decision in everything is final, and Richa will therefore fly the Tanzanian flag at the Miss World beauty pageant later this year in China. She received the crown together with a…
Tuesday, 01 November 2011 09:00

THE KARIMS - A SPORTING DYNASTY

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By Zoeb Tayebjee It is rarely that in any sporting history father and son have been known to represent the country in two disciplines. Yusuf Karim and Asif Karim - father and son - have done so in cricket and in tennis. Yusuf, emigrated to Kenya from Bombay in 1937 when he was barely out of his nappies (at the age of two). He eventually went on to become a sports icon. He took up cricket and tennis, played for the national teams, but later decided to concentrate on tennis, a game that made him the Coast champion virtually uninterruptedly…
Tuesday, 01 November 2011 09:00

CREDIBLE CONSERVATIONISTS

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By Wahida Shah & Anjali Saini The South Asian Community and Environmental Management in Kenya Businesses have long relied on natural resources (ecosystem services) for inputs and profits; these having been available at low or no cost (water, clean air, soil, pollination services, carbon, wood etc). Two important trends have unfolded over the last 30 years that promise an alternative future. First, government agencies at various levels are showing increasing acceptance and interest in environmental policy instruments. Second, businesses across the globe are paying more attention to their responsibilities as corporate citizens as well as the business case for investments…
Tuesday, 01 November 2011 08:59

BORN TAMILS - COMPELLED TO BECOME FRENCH

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By Christian Ghasarian Among the Indian Diaspora living in the Indian Ocean are Tamils who have settled in important number in the relatively isolated Island of La Réunion since the end of the nineteenth century. People of Tamil descent are estimated to be around 120,000 on a total population of 774.000 inhabitants on the Island in 2005. This population has developed some patterns of behavior that are not quite those of their ancestors from Tamil Nadu nor those of the other inhabitants of the multicultural society of La Réunion. Anthropological investigations nevertheless show that despite a strong policy of acculturation…
Tuesday, 01 November 2011 08:59

SIDDIS OF INDIA, AFRICANS IN DIU ISLAND, GUJARAT

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By Ababu Minda Yimene Commercial contact between India and Africa grew substantially after the rise of Islam in the seventh century, and continued through the twentieth century. Until recent eras, this commercial relation involved the mass migration of Africans to Asia for several reasons among which the trade in humans is one. Many African war captives were taken to India to serve as soldiers and domestics among the aristocracy of rising Islamic kingdoms, while some were brought by colonial powers to work as labourers and seamen, and still others emigrated on their own will and engaged in various occupations. Descendants…
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