Tuesday, 01 November 2011 07:33

A LEGEND of the Democratic MOVEMENT

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By Yunus Mahomed Memorial Committee Respected anti-apartheid cadre, development activist and business leader, Yunus Mahomed, who played a pivotal role in the political and civic struggles of the seventies and eighties, passed away suddenly on 6 January at home in Durban, subjugating his own needs to the well being of others right to the last. Seeing to the final arrangements of his long time partner Dhaya Pillay’s 50th birthday celebration with conscientious excitement, he complained only mildly of indigestion to the intimate gathering before quietly retiring to his bedroom during the course of the evening. In the early hours of…
Tuesday, 01 November 2011 07:32

VICTORIA’S TIN DRAGON

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By Awaaz Satya Sood Pegasus Victoria’s Tin Dragon by Dr Satya V Sood is a fascinating account of East Africa’s Uganda Railway written based on the experiences of the Indian railway ‘coolies’ themselves. Sood himself is a descendant of a railway family; his grandfather, Fakir Chand Mayor was appointed station master in Kisumu – ‘the most powerful position that any Indian had been appointed to in the history of the East African Railways’. Fakir Chand was a farmer too, but this book is not just a family biography. Sood has given us an in-depth view of the everyday life of…
Tuesday, 01 November 2011 07:30

SOUTH ASIANS IN KENYA

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By Dharam Ghai Gender, Generation and Changing Identities and Diasporas Pascale Heizig (Münster, LIT, 2006) This book is based on the author’s doctoral dissertation presented at the University of Zurich. The central purpose of the research was to document and analyze the recent economic, social and cultural “transformations” among the Kenyan Asian community. The material for the book was collected through three visits to Kenya in 1997, 1998 and 2000. This consisted of six months of participant observation, semi-structured interviews, a questionnaire survey and personal communications with friends. The book is interspersed with quotations from interviews and abundantly illustrated with…
Tuesday, 01 November 2011 07:29

UHURU STREET

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By Moez G Vassanji Reviewed Books: (i) Jules S, Damji (2006) Oyster Bay & Other Short Stories, Authorhouse, Bloomington, Indiana, USA; (ii) Moez G Vassanji (1992) Uhuru Street, McClelland & Stewart Inc, Toronto, Canada All children in my primary school in colonial Tanzania were brown-skinned, with ancestry in India or Pakistan. Instruction in the first three years was in Gujarati. Only at the age of 13, two years after Independence in 1961, did I have an African friend. And that was because, unlike my Asian peers, I chose to study at the Dar es Salaam Technical College. Else, like them,…
Tuesday, 01 November 2011 07:29

Awaaz in London

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By Awaaz Team Editors Zahid Rajan and Zarina Patel were on a research trip in the UK in May this year and were able to meet with some friends of AwaaZ. Vipool Kalyani, editor of the Opinion, a monthly Gujarati newspaper in London, arranged the gathering at Brent’s library in north London on Saturday, May 24, 2008. About 75 South Asians attended, at least two having traveled from Birmingham and Oxford. Zarina met Hema and Rohini Karve after almost 30 years, her cousin, Fatima Mitchell and her husband, John, were there too. Zahid renewed contact with Jameela Siddiqi, Piyo Rattansi…
Tuesday, 01 November 2011 07:28

Mining in GOA - Environmental Tragedy of our times

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By HARTMAN D’SOUZA If one looks towards the square next to the Tourist Hostel at Calangute beach before the municipal cleaners have got to work, and the area is littered with the debris and garbage expected in Goa these days, one is swept by sadness at the sight of the rusted, neglected, and forgotten statue of the late Dayanand Bandodkar. Not that the anguish will be any less after the square is voided off its dirt, because, if anything, it will only get worse, far more crowded and noisy, and the carelessly strewn rubbish back in a few hours, the…
Tuesday, 01 November 2011 07:26

Reminiscences of DR. M. A. HAQ

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By Mohamed Anwar Fatehdin (USA) The following is what I remember about our dear late Dr. Abdul Haq Sahib way back in Nairobi. I was a young boy when I first met Dr. Haq sometime in 1947. I recall that I used to walk to school from our home on Northview Road to Baridi Road and on to Fairview Road. Where Fairview Road forks off and Yusuf Ali Road begins, the first house is where Dr. Sahib started his first clinic in a residential home owned by Mr. Yusuf Ali Sahib. Dr. Sahib converted the front part of the house…
Tuesday, 01 November 2011 07:25

DR. M. A. HAQ

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By Awaaz Team Every once in a while, there comes along a man who touches the hearts and minds of countless people and thus becomes a living legend amongst men. Dr. M A Haq was such an individual. With the utmost compassion, he comforted and cared for the poor and sick. He passed away ten years ago, on October 2, 1997, leaving a void in the lives of so many people. This article is a tribute to his memory. Dr. Haq dedicated his life to serving the people of Kenya for over half a century. He became famous for his…
Tuesday, 01 November 2011 07:24

Home ni WAPI?

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By SUNITA KAPILA “The lead guy was certainly in a state of bliss” Jassi said to Rookey as they ambled down the stairs from their balcony seat for the concert on Egyptian classics. Another world, another culture and everyone immersed in its magic for a while. The strings were plucked with great gusto, voices floated from hearts, toes were tapping, bodies were swaying – the band rooted in its Egyptian-ness. The bandleader explained why he loved to play traditional tunes. “Trees grow every time their ends sense their roots”. Sense their roots. Not feel, not touch, just sense and it…
Tuesday, 01 November 2011 07:24

“To LEAVE or not to LEAVE...”

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By DIPESH PABARI As we descended into Kisumu last month, I tried to imagine what it was like during the post-election violence. Images from the Kenya Burning exhibition of coffins, streets on fire and police beating up their brothers and sisters ran across my mind but in truth, no matter how hard I tried, it was impossible to imagine my hometown as the bloodbath hanging on the walls at the Go Down. Kisumu was a lot of things but it was certainly not a war torn city. I had been in touch with my folks regularly and other friends from…
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