Wednesday, 02 November 2011 07:14

Footsteps

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Ishan Kapila - The Quiet Patriot By John Githongo Ishan always bothered me with one question asked in a variety of ways and sometimes even penned on paper on official company letterhead and sent to me by messenger. It was one he often pondered over rhetorically. But it was also one he asked in real terms when confronted with officialdom that in turns impressed him - he was especially stirred by small people in small jobs doing noble things - amused, appalled, disgusted and intrigued by the subject of why Kenya – one of God’s truly blessed countries - had…
Wednesday, 02 November 2011 07:13

I Witness - a drama on human emotions

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By Awaaz Recognise the following scenarios? An extremely ‘busy’ dad always away! Providing for the family but spending more time on his ‘business’ and friends than with the family; the mother spending three-quarters of her time in the kitchen cooking for the family and for her husband’s business associates. The eldest child, a girl in this case, carrying emotional burdens far too heavy for her age and being sexually abused by her uncle. The parents are too busy to notice her changed behaviour. The complete absence of parental guidance, control and love results in the son getting into the wrong…
Wednesday, 02 November 2011 07:12

BOSE - The Forotten Hero

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By Awaaz Director Shyam Benegal Shyam Benegal, one of the most talented Indian directors, returns to the big screen after an absence of nearly five years with Bose: The Forgotten Hero, based on the legendary Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose’s life. The film premiered on May 11, 2005 in Kolkata, India. Starring Sachin Khedekar and a host of actors, the film’s music, scored by A R Rahman, is already soaring up the charts. This is an epic film on one of the most enigmatic figures in Indian history. Netaji (leader) is a legend. who was born in Cuttack, Orissa on January…
Wednesday, 02 November 2011 07:11

Quote Me

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By Awaaz “The atheism I practice is not so much a denial of the efficacy of religious belief as an insistence that beliefs of any kind serve a functional purpose in human affairs “- John Reader “All organizations are hierarchical. At each level people serve under those above them. An organization is therefore a structured institution. If it is not structured, it is a mob; mobs do not get things done, they destroy things. The system is the solution” - Theodore Levitt “Freedom does not come automatically; it is achieved. And it is not gained in a single bound; it…
Wednesday, 02 November 2011 07:10

First Word

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Break the chains of segregation By: Zahid Rajan At the recently concluded SAMOSA festival organized by Awaaz from 5-14 May 2005, the participants raised two recurrent themes. One was the importance of researching, recording and disseminating history. “Great history of my people. Let the fire burn,” remarked Jacob Ohingo. “Every Kenyan must participate and all Kenyan communities should come together,” wrote James Njunge Wangui. “Please compile a concise history and submit it to us to be included in our history syllabus,” requested Jimmy Gitonga of the Kenya Institute of Education. The second was the urgency towards building better race relations…
Wednesday, 02 November 2011 07:10

ARZ KIYA HAI . . .

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By Awaaz ‘A poet from the East’ arrived in Nairobi thirty-five years ago and made Kenya her home. She fell in love with the country’s natural beauty and its people and was greatly inspired. On 15 May, 2005, the Kenya Urdu Centre launched her book of poetry and honoured her. To date, she is Africa’s only recognized woman poet who writes in the Urdu language. The title of the book is Soch Kinaray (Strands of thought) and the writer is Jiza-ul-Ihsan. Her name means ‘Reward of a good deed.’ Jiza Butt, daughter of a prominent Kashmiri family, was born in…
Wednesday, 02 November 2011 07:09

IN CONVERSATION: OUT OF AFRICA

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By Prof. Peter Nazareth & Jameela Siddiqui PN: Jameela, how did you come to write a novel after several years of writing music criticism? JS: Actually, I had only just begun to write about music when the novel came tumbling out of me. I had had several years of writing news scripts for a television syndication service which took me as far away as possible from imaginative writing. When I came into music -- that is to say, close encounters with musicians -- and started observing their idiosyncrasies, it triggered off long-forgotten memories of characters I had known as a…
Wednesday, 02 November 2011 07:08

THE WAY WE WERE…GLIMPSES OF THE SAMOSA FESTIVAL

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By Awaaz GLIMPSES OF THE SAMOSA FESTIVAL Awaaz organised a SAMOSA Festival (South Asian Mosaic of Society and the Arts) from 5th to 14th May, 2005. It was held at the Godown Arts Centre on Dunga Road in Nairobi’s Industrial area. The focus of the Festival was a photographic exhibition highlighting outstanding South Asian personalities, events and businesses in Kenya’s colonial era and included some of the African contemporaries. Over a hundred mono-chromatic photographs were on display, captions gave a brief history. Evening events were scheduled with a view to raising awareness of South Asian concerns and of promoting Asian-African…
Wednesday, 02 November 2011 07:07

THE WORLDS INBETWEEN

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By Wanjohi Wa Makokha AN INTERVIEW WITH MOYEZ GULAMHUSSEIN VASSANJI Makokha: Briefly give an account of your early life, education, and your family. Vassanji: These can be found, I think, on the web and on my book. To add a bit more, my great grandfather on my father’s side settled in Kibwezi, Kenya in the 1800s; my mother’s parents settled in Zanzibar in early 1900s; they later moved to Mombasa, then to Dar es Salaam. I went to the various Aga Khan schools in Dar es Salaam. Makokha: Did you have a childhood writing experience? In other words, is writing…
Wednesday, 02 November 2011 07:07

SHIFTING PERSPECTIVES ON EA LITERARY THOUGHT

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By Wanjohi Wa Makokha After, last year’s regrettable attack on Ngugi and his wife in downtown Nairobi, the literary fraternity across the region has been recovering steadily from the shock. All in good time, the Ford Foundation, which is doing a good job with its Distinguished Lecture Series, salved many minds when it brought the Ghanaian novelist, Ayi Kwei Armah to Nairobi. His general theme was the necessity of owning our African pasts, both recent and ancient, in order to be able to focus on the journey ahead of us. This is what I embark to do today. In 1968,…
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