Tuesday, 01 November 2011 14:36

An impeccable end

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By Ray Charles America’s long goodbye to Ronald Reagan was in its sixth day when Ray Charles died; and the news seemed to hit the TV screen like a crack of lightning, a revelation. Charles’ African-American face, his musical roots in black struggle, his very blindness all seemed to serve as reminders of something missing in the many hours of pious commentary about the 40th president’s vision of America. That face - the gleeful, grinning, shaded Charles - seemed as if it had cut into the tributes like a jazzy, boat-rocking riff inside a staid old hymn. And what it…
Tuesday, 01 November 2011 14:35

Bride and Prejudice

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Directed by Gurinder Chadha By Farah Reza If you want a fun night out, and like a bit of Bollywood singing and dancing, then this is the film for you. The director of Bend it Like Beckham transports Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice to present day Amritsar, India. The meddlesome mother, Mrs Bakshi, is obsessed with arranging marriages for her four rather unfortunate daughters. The film follows the fortunes of these women. Chadha remains true to Austen's original exploration of the horrendous way in which traditions often deem women to be worthless if they are unmarried and not wealthy. Chadha's…
Tuesday, 01 November 2011 14:35

Stone Hills of Maragoli - Life on the fringes

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By Stanley A. Gazemba By Richard Bartlett Having spent a week at the London Book Fair and seminars related to books and Africa I realise how much work has to be done. Not just when it comes to Africa, but especially when it comes to enlightening ignorant and patronising Europeans as to what our continent has to offer. Too often the debates veered away from literature and got stuck on literacy. There is no arguing that literacy levels in most of the countries on the continent are less than ideal, but when discussion on the need for literacy leads to…
Tuesday, 01 November 2011 14:34

First Word

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The struggle continues . . . By: Zahid Rajan December 2004 marks two years since NARC came to power. The euphoria following the election and the joyous mood all over the country reminded one of our Uhuru celebrations. But since the triumph of NARC, much has gone wrong. Was it all a mirage in the political desert? We are seeing the art of ‘spin doctoring’ in action! My last editorial in October 2004 spoke of HOPE. While much of what I said remains true, recent events have eclipsed the optimism and aspirations. Top of the list is the security situation…
Tuesday, 01 November 2011 14:33

IN THE TRACKS OF TWO INDIAN TRAVELLERS

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By Cynthia Salvadori ‘One book about Indians in Kenya led to another book, to another, to another . . . and finally to one a thousand kilometres away, in the wilds of southwestern Ethiopia.’ The writing of Through Open Doors involved, among many other things, reading every book I could find about the Indians of Kenya, and Pheroze Nowrojee had one of the best collections. Just as I was finishing the revised edition, Pheroze greeted me one morning bubbling with excitement; he had discovered another book, given to him by his mother’s great friend Freny Sorabjee. It had been written…
Tuesday, 01 November 2011 14:32

WANGARI MAATHAI AFRICA’S WONDER WOMAN

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By Jonathan Kariara And are the waters so bitter then? is the heart so hungry? we saw the thighs of our mothers naked in broad day light save for the batons for the tuncheons for the metal helmets of our men Saw a face so contorted with anger recalling the grotesque sculpture of our ancestor mask shaped -to keep us from evil spirits -protect the people -heal the land not with guns Shame? no, not shame those naked thighs of our mothers the carved thighs of the chief’s stool of the Baluba will tell you no, not shame To exorcise…
Tuesday, 01 November 2011 14:32

HOME TO ROOST

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By Susan Gachoka's The flapping creatures had the strangest cries she had ever heard from birds. 3 big marabou stork, wings un-flapping and outstretched, spindly long legs poised to make a landing on the mound of rubbish, their long beaks closed, yet the cry yip! yip! yip! penetrated her mind; misplaced and trying to find a niche in her sub-conscious; unrelenting and sharp. Now the marabou stork, were no more, but that yip! yip! yip had changed slightly in pitch and tone. Whereas before it was plaintive and begging, it now increased in tempo . . . demanding. It was…
Tuesday, 01 November 2011 14:31

CAPITALIST CURRIES AND CATEGORICAL CONQUISTADORES

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By Dipesh Pabari The author is the Humane Education Officer, World Society for the Protection of Animals. “Every single time something is done with a purpose in view, something fundamentally different and other occurs.” Nietsche Anthropology, like most of us, has had to go through several personal crises. You know, just like that time in your life when suddenly you discovered things are not quite what we thought they were; the world, society and our immediate surroundings do not quite fit into the perspective they unquestionably once did. For a while we are unable to listen properly, we hesitate, we…
Tuesday, 01 November 2011 14:31

THE GIFT OF SELFLESS SERVICE

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By Saral Nene Saral Nene (nee Dabholkar) was born on 15 September, 1927 in Mumbai, India. Her father took early retirement from the Customs Department in order to look after his ancestral home in the village of Dabholi, District Ratnagiri, Maharashtra State. The whole Dabholkar family then moved south, and Saral led the simple life of a typical village girl attending school and doing her matric, or ‘O’ level, exams. However illness in the family and new land tenure laws were to change the course of her future. Both her sister and her cousin succumbed to an epidemic of typhoid…
Tuesday, 01 November 2011 14:30

THE ASIAN FOUNDATION - HONOURING TODAY’S HEROES

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By Awaaz Team The Asian Foundation celebrated its 15th anniversary on Thursday, 4th November, 2004. The organization was established by public spirited individuals who felt that for Kenya, economic success was the key to a just and peaceful society in which its citizens could enjoy equality of opportunity. Leading business persons, professionals, industrialists and others established the Foundation in order to participate collectively in the development of the country. To date from several projects the most enterprising one has been the City Park Hawkers Market in Nairobi. A similar ‘Kibuye Market’ is being built in Kisumu. The Foundation is in…
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